Mini Cooper S (with Mini Connected) 2011

Mini Cooper S with Mini Connected

Mini 1

The Mini Cooper S treads a fine line. It’s not incredibly practical, with a boot the size of a shoebox, 2 seats that are about as comfortable as garden furniture, and another 2 seats that are about as useful as a pork chop in a synagogue.  These drawbacks are unfortunately the price you pay to have the other exceptional characteristics of the car, so it’s all about compromise. You need to be a very specific type of person to drive a MINI and in my mind there are three different drivers (generalization warning ahead!)

Firstly, ‘The handbag-on the-arm-glass-straight-GHD’d-hair-sexy-woman’

It’s the MINI’s smorgasbords of customizable options, unique looks and “cute” factor that attracts her to the car. The Cooper S I drove had burnt orange paintwork, with white wheels, racing stripes, mirrors and roof. Every person that saw it, whether they were 25 or 55, said it looked “cool”. The MINI is not a new car, and I still found it turned heads wherever I went.

Bi Xenon Headlamps

You could say the interior is slightly more tailored towards the female driver, its switchgear unlike anything you’ve ever seen, with unique ‘mood lighting’ that allows you to change the colour of the ambiance lighting to ANY colour in the rainbow. (A very cool touch, and always gets the “oooh” factor from anyone that gets in) The seats are all leather (optional), with everything you’d need (Electric windows, mirrors, climate control and steering-wheel mounted controls). My only big criticism, albeit one that is obviously hard to please considering the size of the car, is that there isn’t enough space to put things, and I found my stuff sliding all over the floor like the deck-crew of Deadliest Catch.

The next buyer is what I will call the ‘I roll my own cigarettes, jegging clad, scarf bedazzled, instagramming hipster’. The MINI speaks to this new breed of hipsters for the reasons above (I’m unique, just like everyone else) but also the ability to connect with everyone on their social platforms. This is, as far as I know, the only car on the market that boasts the features that Connected brings to the MINI. In a nutshell, Connected, well, connects every social aspect of your iPhone to the MINI, allowing you to stream feeds (Facebook, RSS, Twitter, Web Radio) straight to the colour screen front and centre on the dash.

Interior by night

There’s a couple other games, using game theory, in the Connected app, that reward you with points for certain styles of driving, but overall the ability to see what’s going on within your online social profiles right there on the dash is pretty effing cool. It connects to any iPhone using the Connected app (download for FREE) and can also do the other (calls, music) functionality via Bluetooth should you not want to plug in. It’s a great system that will evolve to functionality far beyond just viewing, but also interacting (such as the connected system on recent BMW’s, allowing you to Google via the car).

The final buyer is of course the driving enthusiast. ‘The spiky hair, tight name-brand muscle shirt, speed junkie’. If you’re like me, and you enjoy sheer driving pleasure, then this car is, no doubt, one you will like. It’s no long distance cruiser, but rather a medium distance twists and turns rocket ship. The 135kW 1.6litre Turbo (previous generation were supercharged) engine is a great motor, with nearly no turbo lag, strong shove all through the revs. There’s ample torque all through the revs, but it does cut the fun rather quickly at 6,500RPM. I had a steptronic (Automatic) with paddles on the steering wheel, which, I must admit, I was very weary of at first. The auto quickly grew on me, making it a pleasure to drive in traffic, and very easy to drive when throwing through the twisties. Purists will disagree, but I enjoyed the auto box when the speed picked up, because it meant I could keep both hands firmly planted, as the MINI does tend to tug at the wheel with all that power to the front. There is also a short overboost function that ups the torque to 260Nm for a short period of time, should you need to make that gap you’ve judged badly.

Mini, Front 3/4 View

Another incredible little button is the SPORT button, situated right in front of the gear lever. This little button dials up throttle response, noticeably tightens up steering as well as dials in a sport function on the gearbox (for the auto). It’s an incredible change of character to the car, and really brings a HUGE smile to my face when bobbing through traffic, or out on a swooping open road. The car gathers speed quickly, and thanks to low profile run-flats with sports suspension, the handling is sublime (read jaw shatteringly hard). You’ll get the DSC (Dynamic Stability Control) to kick in fairly easily, but the short wheel base, FWD, and lightness of the car makes it OH so much fun!

Fuel consumption, although I didn’t bother, was actually fairly good (considering) at around 7.2l/100km

Mini with filter

Over and above, this car came pretty well kitted out, with dynamic xenon headlamps, puddle lighting, chrome detailing and various other options to make it well specced. These options (and vast customization) come at a premium. Starting out, this Cooper S will go for roughly R306 000 (incl emissions tax) and I tried to work out the optional extras, which came to about R46 000, putting it at around R355 000. It’s not cheap, but it’s heaps of fun, stands out of the crowd, and will keep you smiling. If you can put up with the stiff ride, size, and price, it’s definitely worth a look if you recognise yourself in any of those above mentioned driver profiles

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